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    Default Caffeine and Performance

    Are you taking caffeine to kickstart your workouts? How much does it actually help your performance?
    .
    This new systematic review and meta-analysis looked at some of the best evidence to answer whether caffeine improves strength (1RM) and power (vertical jump).
    .
    The authors only included studies that used caffeine in capsule, liquid, gum or gel form. They excluded those who used caffeine in the form of coffee or alongside other compounds. .
    Most studies used between 3 and 7 mg of caffeine per kg of bodyweight about an hour before the experiment. On the high end, that would amount to 560mg of caffeine for a 80 kg person.
    .
    Overall, caffeine showed small to medium benefits on performance, which in real life could signify meaningful changes in results from training, especially at a more advanced level of training.
    .
    Interestingly, when analyzing subgroups, the authors also found that caffeine increased upper body strength but not lower body strength.

    Are you taking caffeine to kickstart your workouts? How much does it actually help your performance?
    .
    This new systematic review and meta-analysis looked at some of the best evidence to answer whether caffeine improves strength (1RM) and power (vertical jump).
    .
    The authors only included studies that used caffeine in capsule, liquid, gum or gel form. They excluded those who used caffeine in the form of coffee or alongside other compounds. .
    Most studies used between 3 and 7 mg of caffeine per kg of bodyweight about an hour before the experiment. On the high end, that would amount to 560mg of caffeine for a 80 kg person.
    .
    Overall, caffeine showed small to medium benefits on performance, which in real life could signify meaningful changes in results from training, especially at a more advanced level of training.
    .
    Interestingly, when analyzing subgroups, the authors also found that caffeine increased upper body strength but not lower body strength.
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by drtbear1967 View Post
    Are you taking caffeine to kickstart your workouts? How much does it actually help your performance?
    .
    This new systematic review and meta-analysis looked at some of the best evidence to answer whether caffeine improves strength (1RM) and power (vertical jump).
    .
    The authors only included studies that used caffeine in capsule, liquid, gum or gel form. They excluded those who used caffeine in the form of coffee or alongside other compounds. .
    Most studies used between 3 and 7 mg of caffeine per kg of bodyweight about an hour before the experiment. On the high end, that would amount to 560mg of caffeine for a 80 kg person.
    .
    Overall, caffeine showed small to medium benefits on performance, which in real life could signify meaningful changes in results from training, especially at a more advanced level of training.
    .
    Interestingly, when analyzing subgroups, the authors also found that caffeine increased upper body strength but not lower body strength.

    Are you taking caffeine to kickstart your workouts? How much does it actually help your performance?
    .
    This new systematic review and meta-analysis looked at some of the best evidence to answer whether caffeine improves strength (1RM) and power (vertical jump).
    .
    The authors only included studies that used caffeine in capsule, liquid, gum or gel form. They excluded those who used caffeine in the form of coffee or alongside other compounds. .
    Most studies used between 3 and 7 mg of caffeine per kg of bodyweight about an hour before the experiment. On the high end, that would amount to 560mg of caffeine for a 80 kg person.
    .
    Overall, caffeine showed small to medium benefits on performance, which in real life could signify meaningful changes in results from training, especially at a more advanced level of training.
    .
    Interestingly, when analyzing subgroups, the authors also found that caffeine increased upper body strength but not lower body strength.
    Wonder if the difference between upper body strength increase but not lower body strength increase has to do with the slow and fast twitch muscle fibers?

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