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Thread: Evidence Based Training - What works.

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    Musclechemistry Site Representative Board Certified MD drtbear1967's Avatar
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    Default Evidence Based Training - What works.



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    igf 1 lr3, igf-1, insulin-like growth factor-1,


    SARM Rad 140 , testolone, sarm s23, Ligandrol, Andarine, Ostarine, Cardarine
    Load and Repetition Range

    [COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.84)]If a set of repetitions is performed to failure, it makes little to no difference how much weight (load) you use. This comes with the caveat that there are limits to this. For instance, if you choose a weight with which you can do 30 reps, or 1 rep, these are unlikely to optimally recruit muscle fibers. But otherwise, studies have found little difference on muscle hypertrophy in lifting heavy weights (90% of max possible, or 90%RM), or lighter weights (30%RM), so long as the lift is done to failure. However, heavier weights (80%RM) appear to increase bone mineral density more than lighter.[/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.84)]Recommendation: Select a weight of 80%RM and do reps to failure, which is optimal for strength, muscular endurance, and bone density.[/COLOR]
    Repetition Duration

    [COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.84)]Repetition duration refers to cadence, that is, the amount of time it takes to perform 1 rep, i.e. slow vs fast. Repetitions should be done at a slow enough pace that muscular tension is always maintained. Fast reps or using momentum — jerking the weights around — do not maintain muscular tension.[/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.84)]Recommendation: Lift slowly enough to maintain muscular tension. In extreme cases, this may be 10 seconds up, 10 down, though that doesn’t appear to be necessary. I use a cadence of 4–5 seconds up, same down.[/COLOR]
    Rest Intervals

    [COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.84)]This is the time spent between sets, and the preponderance of scientific evidence shows that it has little effect on strength gains.[/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.84)]For pure muscle growth, don’t worry about rest intervals. Take as much or as little time as you like.[/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.84)]However, rest intervals may make a difference to cardiovascular conditioning. If you want to emphasize the cardiovascular aspect of training, short rest intervals are better.[/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.84)]Recommendation: Select your own rest interval for muscle growth. Use short rest intervals for cardiovascular conditioning.[/COLOR]
    Volume and Frequency

    [COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.84)]These refer to the number of sets and the frequency of training sessions, and this area shows probably the greatest disparity between what most people, including veteran lifters, believe, and what the science says.[/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.84)]There’s little evidence that performing more than 1 set of each exercise increases muscle growth, if that 1 set is done to failure.[/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.84)]There’s little evidence to support any recommendation as to frequency. Some studies have reported no difference with a training frequency of once vs twice a week, other studies showing no difference between twice or three times a week. My own experience tells me that you can trainso long as you feel fully rested and recovered.[/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.84)]Recommendation: Single set training appears to be as effective as multiple sets for muscle growth. There’s little scientific evidence for a recommendation as to frequency of training.[/COLOR]
    Endurance Training and Lifting

    [COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.84)]Some people worry that doing endurance training might hinder their lifting gains. There’s no evidence that it does, so do endurance training also if that’s what you want to do. However, additional training may hinder recovery time.[/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.84)]Recommendation: Endurance training doesn’t hinder muscle growth.[/COLOR]
    Range of Motion

    [COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.84)]Most trainers recommend you use a full range of motion for each rep in order to get the most growth. But there’s no evidence for this. A restricted range of motion appears to increase strength and size as much as full range.[/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.84)]Recommendation: Use any range of motion you like.[/COLOR]
    Get It Done!

  2. #2
    Musclechemistry Site Representative Board Certified MD drtbear1967's Avatar
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    Sorry guys, wouldn't let me edit.
    Get It Done!

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