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    Default Hair restoration peptide study Copper peptide (ghk-Cu tripeptide-1) for hair*growth

    For those prone to hair loss, like me , we are always looking for an affordable effective way to regrow hair. I mean some may do whatever it takes others except it but for me I want hair but I'm not gonna go broke tryin' to regrow it....... Enter Copper peptide (ghk-Cu tripeptide-1) for hair*growth.



    During the past decade we have examined both the therapeutic and the prophylactic effects of several agents on the macaque model of androgenetic alopecia. Minoxidil and diazoxide, potent hypotensive agents acting as peripheral vasodilators, are known to have a hypertrichotic side effect. Topical use of both agents induced significant hair regrowth in the bald scalps of macaques. The application of a steroid 5 alpha-reductase inhibitor (4MA) in non-bald preadolescent macaques has prevented baldness, whereas controls developed it during 2 years of treatment. The effects of hair growth were determined by 1) phototrichogram, 2) folliculogram (micro-morphometric analysis), and 3) the rate of DNA synthesis in the follicular cells. These effects were essentially a stimulation of the follicular cell proliferation, resulting in an enlargement of the anagen follicles from vellus to terminal type (therapy) or a maintenance of the prebald terminal follicles (prevention). A copper binding peptide (PC1031) had the effect of follicular enlargement on the back skin of fuzzy rats, covering the vellus follicles; the effect was similar to that of topical minoxidil. Analyzing the quantitative sequences of follicular size and cyclic phases, we speculate on the effect of agents on follicular growth. We also discuss the triggering mechanism of androgen in the follicular epithelial-mesenchymal (dermal papilla) interaction.



    Copper peptide GHK-Cu is a naturally occurring copper complex of a glycyl-L-histidyl-L-lysine peptide. Since it has three amino acids it is called tripeptide. The GHK-Cu tripeptide has strong affinity for copper(II) and was first isolated from human plasma. It can be found also in saliva and urine.



    Overview Copper peptides are naturally occurring small protein fragments that have high affinity to copper ions.[2] In human plasma, the level of GHK-Cu is about 200 µg/ml at age 20. By the age of 60, the level drops to 80 µg/ml. In humans, tripeptide GHK-Cu can promote activation of wound healing, attraction of immune cells, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, stimulation of collagen and glycosaminoglycan synthesis in skin fibroblasts and promotion of blood vessels growth. Recent studies revealed its ability to modulate expression of a large number of human genes, generally reversing gene expression to a healthier state. Synthetic GHK-Cu is used in cosmetics as a reparative and anti-aging ingredient.[3]



    History Loren Pickart isolated the copper peptide GHK-Cu from human plasma albumin in 1973.[4] Pickart noticed that liver tissue obtained from patients aged 60 to 80 years had an increased level of fibrinogen. However, when liver cells from old patients were incubated in the blood from the younger group, the older cells started functioning in nearly the same way as the younger liver tissue.[5][6] It turned out that this effect was due to a small peptide factor that behaved similarly to the synthetic peptide glycyl-L-histidyl-L-lysine (GHK). Pickart proposed that this activity in human plasma albumin was a tripeptide glycyl-L-histidyl-L-lysine and that it might function by chelating metal ions.[7]



    In 1977, David Schlesinger of the Harvard University Chemistry Department confirmed that the growth modulating peptide isolated by Pickart was a glycyl-L-histidyl-L-lysine peptide.[8]



    Further research established that GHK peptide has a strong affinity for copper and exists in two forms – GHK and GHK-Cu. On the basis of the available data, it was proposed that GHK-Cu functions by modulating copper intake into cells.[9]



    Wound healing Biochemical studies In the late 1980s, copper peptide GHK-Cu started attracting attention as a promising wound healing agent. Pioneers in this field were J.P Borel and F. Maquart from Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne (France). At optimal, picomolar to nanomolar concentrations, GHK-Cu stimulated the synthesis of collagen in skin fibroblasts, increased accumulation of total proteins, glycosaminoglycans (in a biphasic curve)and DNA in the dermal wounds in rats. They also found out that the GHK sequence is present in collagen and suggested that the GHK peptide is released after tissue injury.[10][11] They proposed a class of emergency response molecules which are released from the extracellular matrix at the site of an injury.[12] GHK-Cu also increased synthesis of decorin – a small proteoglycan involved in the regulation of collagen synthesis, wound healing regulation and anti-tumor defense.[13]



    The same group established that GHK-Cu stimulated both the synthesis of metalloproteinases, the enzymes which break down dermal proteins, and their inhibitors (anti-proteases). The fact that GHK-Cu not only stimulates the production of dermal components, but also regulates their breakdown suggests that it should be used with caution.[14]



    Wound healing in animals A series of animal experiments established pronounced wound healing activity of copper peptide GHK-Cu. In the dermal wounds of rabbits GHK-Cu facilitated wound healing, causing better wound contraction, faster development of granular tissue and improved angiogenesis. It also elevated the level of antioxidant enzymes.[15][16]



    Human trials A 2% GHK gel showed promising results in treatment of 120 diabetic patients, increasing the percentage of ulcer closure from 60.8% to 98.5%, and decreasing the percentage of infection from 34% to 7%. The rate of healing was three times greater with GHK.[20] However, a 0.4% GHK-Cu cream failed to reach therapeutic goal in treatment of venous ulcers.[21]



    Current research Anti-inflammatory activity GHK peptide has anti-inflammatory properties. Even though an exact mechanism remains unclear, in a recent study GHK and its copper complexes decreased TNF-alpha-dependent IL-6 secretion in normal human dermal fibroblasts. Because of the anti-inflammatory properties, copper-peptides could replace corticosteroids or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in treatment of inflammatory skin conditions. They also can reduce UV-induced erythema.[22]



    DNA repair Radioactive anti-cancer treatment slows cell replication by breaking DNA strands. A recent study showed GHK-Cu's ability to restore function of irradiated fibroblasts to that of intact cells. The researchers used cultured human fibroblasts obtained from cervical skin that was either intact or exposed to radioactive treatment (5000 rad). At a very low (1 nanomolar) concentration, GHK-Cu stimulated irradiated fibroblasts growth and increased their production of growth factors bFGF and VGF to the point where it became even higher than that of both the irradiated and intact control cells.[23]



    Nerve regeneration In 2005, Ahmed et al. demonstrated that GHK promotes nerve regeneration. Axon regeneration was studied using collagen tubes with incorporated peptides. GHK increased migration of hematogenous cells into collagen tube, production of nerve growth factors, expression of integrins and the rate of regeneration of myelinated nerve fibers. In addition, GHK also increased axon count and proliferation of Schwann cells compared to the control.[24]



    Effect on stem cells In 2009, a group of researchers from the Seoul National University (Republic of Korea) demonstrated that the copper-peptide GHK-Cu stimulated proliferation of keratinocytes and increased expression of integrins and p63 protein in the epidermal stem cells. Since p63 is considered to be an important marker of stem cell and anti-senescence protein, the authors concluded that GHK-copper is able to recover epidermal stem cells and increase their ability to repair tissue. [25] In 2012, the same group reported that similar activity was observed for copper-free GHK.[26]



    Anti-cancer effect In 2010, Hong Y. et al. demonstrated that GHK-Cu is able to reverse the expression of certain genes involved in metastatic spreading of colon cancer. GHK-Cu was effective at a very low concentration - 1mkM.[27] A 2012 paper reports that GHK, at a very low concentration, does not harm normal fibroblasts (a major repair cell) but did induce programmed cell death two cancer cell lines. Thus, GHK reversed this effect of the cancer cells on the genes.[28]



    Genomic studies Recent genomic research suggests that GHK directly modulates gene expression, which may explain the diversity of its biological actions. Iorio et al. used a repository of transcriptional responses to compounds, the Connectivity Map (cMap),[29] and MANTRA software to explore networks of compounds producing similar transcriptional responses. GHK, as one of the compounds studied, increased mRNA production in 268 genes while suppressing 167.[30] GHK was found to reverse the gene-expression signature of emphysematous destruction found in lung tissue obtained from smokers with COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease). The gene expression signature associated with emphysema severity included 127 genes, involved in inflammation and repair. Using the Connectivity Map, researchers established that the peptide GHK downregulated genes involved in lung destruction and inflammation, while upregulating genes involved in tissue repair. Addition of 10 nanomolar GHK to lung fibroblasts from emphysema lungs restored their ability to remodel collagen and assemble it into properly organized fibrils.[31]



    Cosmetic use Facial studies Copper peptide GHK-Cu is widely used in anti-aging cosmetics (INCI name: Copper tripeptide-1).[32] Several controlled facial studies confirmed anti-aging, firming and anti-wrinkle activity of copper peptide GHK-Cu. Abdulghani et al. established that facial cream containing GHK-Cu increased collagen in photoaged skin of 20 female volunteers, performing better than vitamin C and retinoic acid.[33]



    Leyden et al. conducted a 12-week facial study of GHK-Cu containing face and eye cream, reporting significant improvement of skin laxity, clarity and appearance, reduced fine lines and the depths of wrinkles and increased skin density and thickness comparing to placebo. GHK-Cu eye cream performed better than vitamin K cream.[34]



    Finkley et al. conducted 12 week facial study on 67 women and reported that GHK-Cu cream applied twice daily improved aged skin appearance, increased thickness, reduced wrinkles and strongly stimulated dermal keratinocyte proliferation as determined by histological analysis of biopsies. The same study found copper peptide GHK-Cu to be non-toxic and non-irritating.[35]



    Hair growth Copper peptide GHK-Cu and its analogues were found to stimulate hair growth. In some circumstances, the efficiency of synthetic analog of GHK-Cu was similar to that of 5% minoxidil.[36] A commercial product GraftCyte was clinically proven to improve hair transplantation outcome.[37]



    Biological chemistry Copper binding Research of the copper binding properties of GHK and two synthetic peptides, in which histidine was replaced with a synthetic amino acid, established that the amino acid glycine plays major role in copper binding, while lysine can interact with copper only at alkaline pH. At physiological pH, lysine is able to interact with a cellular receptor. The ability of GHK to interact both with copper and with a cellular receptor allows it to transfer copper into and from cells. The small size of GHK permits speedy traveling in extracellular space and its easy access to cellular receptors.[38]
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    Yea some guys here gonna love this Shit
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    ONE MORE REP YEAH BUDDY

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    I was reading TB500 stimulates hair growth as well. Probably no where near this extent though!
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    shit how the fuck did i ever miss this post lol, GOD knows I'm needing some hair line help lol
    Author: Ben Presser
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    so does this exist and has anyone actually used it, is it topical or?
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    Here is some other interesting info I found
    Stimulation of Hair Growth

    Study Result Reference
    Use of GHK-Cu analogs for hair follicle enlargement and stimulation of hair growth Methods for the design and testing of copper-peptide complexes with hair growth properties are described.
    A wide variety of GHK-Cu analogs were described that increase hair follicle size and increase hair growth in mice and rats.
    US Patent 5,120,831 New metal peptide complexes and derivatives used for stimulating growth of hair in warm-blooded animals, especially humans. Pickart US Patent 5,177,061 Compositions for stimulating hair growth containing cupric complexes of peptide derivatives including. glycyl-l-histidyl-l-lysine n-octyl ester. Pickart US Patent 5,214,032 New glycyl-histidyl-lysyl copper compounds used in stimulating hair growth. Pickart US 5,550,183 Metal-peptide compositions and methods for stimulating hair growth. Pickart
    Stimulation of hair growth in mice GHK analogs with hydrophobic residues were tested and found to stimulate hair growth in rats. The hair follicle stimulating properties of peptide copper complexes. Results in C3H mice. Fors, Pickart and Uno Ann N Y Acad Sci 1991 26;642:468-9
    Stimulation of hair growth in mice and rats The details of hair stimulation by copper peptides was studied by 1) phototrichogram, 2) folliculogram (micro morphometric analysis), and 3) the rate of DNA synthesis in the follicular cells. The effects were essentially a stimulation of the follicular cell proliferation, resulting in an enlargement of the anagen follicles from vellus to terminal type (therapy) or a maintenance of the piebald terminal follicles (prevention). A SRCP (PC1020) had the effect of follicular enlargement on the back skin of fuzzy rats, covering the vellus follicles. Chemical agents and peptides affect hair growth. Uno and Kurata (University of Wisconsin, Madison, USA) J Invest Dermatol 1993 101(1 Suppl):143S-147S
    Minimizing hair loss after cancer chemotherapy Hairloss protection by peptide-copper complex in animal models of chemotherapy-induced alopecia. Awa and Nogimori Journal Of Dermatological Science, Vol: 10, 1995, 99-104
    Human hair growth Stimulation of hair growth in humans with GHK-Cu analogs Phototrichogram Analysis of Hair Follicle Stimulation: A pilot clinical study with a peptide-copper complex. Patt, Duncan and Kalis (University of Reims, France) Dermatological Research Techniques, (CRC Press), pp-217-226, 1996
    Hair growth in rats Stimulation of hair growth in rats Quantitative Assessment of Peptide-Copper Complex Induced Hair Follicle Stimulation Using the Fuzzy Rat, Uno, Packard, Patt (University of Wisconsin) Dermatological Research Techniques, (CRC Press), pp-227-239, 1996
    Hair growth in rats Stimulation of hair growth in rats with GHK-Cu analogs Evaluation of Telogen Hair Follicle Stimulation Using an In Vivo Model: Results with Peptide Copper Complexes. Timpe, Dumwiddie, Patt (Procyte Corp.) Dermatological Research Techniques, (CRC Press), pp-241-254, 1996
    Human study of hair growth with GHK-Cu analog Compared GHK-CU analog in Tricomin with 2% minoxidil. Tricomin 2.5% increased hair count by 97 non-vellus hairs while 2% minoxidil increased count by 73 non-vellus hair after 3 months (non-vellus hair count) Procyte Corp. press release 1997
    Breakdown resistant, long acting copper-peptides used for stimulation of hair growth Tested copper complexed with protein peptones for hair growth effects in mice. Copper-peptide mixture produced more hair growth in mice than GHK-Cu analogs Pickart US Patent 5,554,375 Tissue protective and regenerative compositions.
    Review Skin remodeling and hair growth Pickart L, Effect of copper peptides on hair growth and condition, Body Language Dermatology 2004, Number 7, pages 20-22
    Review Skin remodeling and hair growth Pickart L, Skin remodeling copper peptides for improving hair growth, Cosmetics & Medicine (Russia) 2004, Number 3, pages 14-29
    Study of human follicles in organ culture AHK-Cu increased follicular cell growth while decreasing progrmmed cell death (apoptosis) Pyo HK, Yoo HG, Won CH, Lee SH, Kang YJ, Eun HC, Cho KH, Kim KH, The effect of tripeptide-copper complex on human hair growth, Arch Pharm Res 2007, vol 7, 834-839.

    GHK-Cu Analogs and Stimulation of Hair Growth
    Certain analogs of GHK-Cu have the property of enlarging hair follicles and stimulating hair growth. These analogs have more fat-like character than GHK-Cu. This increase in fat-like properties is obtained by either chemically synthesizing fatty acids into the GHK molecule or attaching amino acid residues such as alanine, phenylalanine or leucine to the basic GHK structure.
    These analogs originally arose in an attempt to create GHK-Cu analogs which would be retained in body tissues for longer periods of time. However, it was noted that - while such analogs were superior wound healing agents - they also markedly increased hair growth around the periphery of experimental wounds in mice.
    These hair stimulating analogs were created by Drs. Steven Lovejoy, Loren Pickart and Boris Weinstein. Skin repair and hair growth enhancement effects are closely linked. New skin appears to arise from the hair follicle. Certain products based on Iamin can be used to both repair skin, increase hair follicle size, and stimulate hair growth. As a person ages, our hair follicles get smaller, producing thinner hair shafts. A major cause of hair follicle miniaturization appears to be due to the development of striking changes in capillaries surrounding the hair follicles. Comprehensive surveys of the male scalp from birth to senescence find very significant changes in the structure of the blood vessels of the scalp. The number of the blood capillary loops supplying the hair follicle is greatly diminished. The inadequate subepidermal circulation that can develop as males age does not provide a rich nutrition for the follicle. Strong hair growth requires a large flow of nutrients such as such as vitamins, minerals and amino acids so that the follicle can actively synthesize new hair.
    Blood flow impairments to the follicle, and their reversal, may explain why the administration of copper peptides (such as Tricomin) to the scalp increases hair growth and increase the size of hair shafts. It has long been known that certain copper-peptide complexes strongly stimulate angiogenesis or new blood vessel formation. The increase in hair follicle size and the rate of hair growth caused by the administration of copper-peptides may be due to their causing blood flow changes that provide adequate nutrients to the follicle, producing faster growing hair with thicker hair shafts. Copper ion complexed with certain peptides has both skin repair and hair growth enhancement effects. Examples of this are Tricomin and GraftCyte which are based on Pickart's earlier work (from ProCyte Corporation).
    More follicular cell growth and less programmed cell death (apoptosis)
    During aging in men and women, there is a progressive decrease in hair follicle size. This produces thinner hair and in time stops new hair growth.
    Pyo et al (refererence above) propose, based on studies of human hair follicles, that the actions of copper peptides increase cell growth in cultured hair follicles while decreasing programmed cell death or apoptosis. Copper pepides also decrease the Bax protein which increases apoptosis. Their studies use Ala-His-Lys-copper, as close analog of GHK, that I had found to stimulate hair growth many years ago.
    So, the copper peptides may function by slowing the rate of programmed cell death in human hair follicles that ultimately stops human hair growth.


    The skin of the mouse to the left was shaved, then treated in three spots with copper peptides. The result is a much more rapid hair growth (the three circular patches of hair) in the three spots treated with copper peptides. While human hair growth will not respond nearly as dramatically as in mice, skin health and hair follicle function are closely interrelated. New skin appears to arise from the hair follicle. As a person ages, our hair follicles get smaller, producing thinner hair shafts. The blood circulation that supplies nutrients and oxygen to the hair follicle send fewer blood vessels to the hair follicle, thus inhibiting the vital flow of nutrients to the hair follicle. Copper-peptide complexes improve skin health and a more healthy skin increases the blood vessel network to the hair follicles resulting in larger follicles that grow hair faster with thicker hair shafts.










    In the microscopic images to the left, the magnifications are identical. The top photo is mouse skin untreated with copper-peptides. The bottom photo is mouse skin treated with copper-peptides. Note the larger hair follicles (the elongated purple columns) in the lower photo, the increased content of subcutaneous fat in the skin (the white material in the center of the skin), and the increased thickness of the skin. When we are young, we have a layer of fat under the skin (part of "baby fat") which is greatly reduced as we age. Hair researchers have noted the accumulation of this fat around healthy follicles that are vigorously growing hair, and its relative lack around dormant follicles, have postulated that these cells serve a supportive function for the hair follicle. It must be emphasized that effects in humans on hair follicle health are not as dramatic.






    New Hair Follicle Formation?



    At times, SRCPs can apparently induce a proliferation of hair follicles, although this phenomena is difficult to reproduce on a consistent basis. The photograph on the top is a microscopic field of mouse hair follicles in an animal treated only with saline. The photograph on the bottom is a similar area of mouse skin treated with copper-peptides and which has a much higher density of hair follicles. Individual experiments on hair follicle multiplication are consistent, that is, the effect is actual when it occurs, but repeated results are difficult to obtain. The variability may be due to different timing in the hair growth cycle or slight changes in the type of, or formulation of, the copper-peptide preparations. Such experiments strongly suggest that, under certain circumstances, new hair follicle formation can be induced in adult animals.
















    here is the complete study ALOT of info here
    https://skinbiology.com/copperpeptideregeneration.html
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    ok im in! where can i get some new hair growth formula lol
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    yea where can i get some of this at?
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    Quote Originally Posted by shdy333 View Post
    yea where can i get some of this at?
    I know this is a old thread, but I thought I would answer this question. You can GHK-copper peptide on Amazon. Here are the two that I'm looking at
    https://www.amazon.com/Rejuvenate-En...dp/B009XVGZY2/
    https://www.amazon.com/Solution-Ingr...dp/B00TRAU2HK/
    This site recommends using it with Emu oil before bed.
    https://www.folligen.com/
    GHK-copper peptide is also used for better, younger looking skin care.
    Last edited by icedemon; 07-31-2016 at 02:47 PM.
     

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    Thinning hair from Steroid / hormones by way of the DHT strangling your hair roots is easier to regrow than traditional natural genetic balding with Copper Peptide: ghk-Cu tripeptide-1

    I have no idea whether or not this statement is true?????
    Author: Ben Presser
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    Does anyone know the protocol for mixing and injection dosage for GHK-cu 50 mg.?
    I have used bacteriostatic water in the vial of GHK-cu 50 mg.
    How much should be injected? How many mcgs per injection, and how many
    injections per day? Thank you for the help. My husband and I have been
    using the PT-141 and the GRF 1-29 with great results. Want to start using the
    copper peptide GHK-cu 50 mg. but need proper dosages. Lois
     

  12. #12
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    I'm seeing more research chemical stores sell this these days. It looks like the research is on the up-and-up.
    Area-1255;"the last of the honest bloggers".
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