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    Default How to Perform Reverse Curls Correctly

    Lifters everywhere love striking the double biceps pose as a way to show off their hard work in the gym. After all, what could be a better gym business card than showcasing the peak and thickness of the mountain on your upper arm?
    Whether you are just starting out or are a seasoned lifter, you're likely all too familiar with bicep curls. But are you missing out on a move that can help you progress even more? If you aren't doing reverse curls, then the answer to that question is a resounding yes.
    If reverse curls don't have a spot in your routine, not only are you leaving some bicep gains on the table, but you're also missing out on the chance to fix forearm imbalances. Fortunately, we're about to get into the nitty-gritty of the reverse curl, so you can get it into your split quickly.
    This post will cover:

    What is the reverse curl?
    What muscles do reverse curls work?
    Reverse curls vs. bicep curls vs. hammer curls: Which is better?
    Equipment to use for reverse curls
    How to perform the reverse barbell curl and mistakes to avoid
    Benefits of the reverse bicep curl
    Best reverse curl variations, alternatives, and programming tips
    Sample biceps workout


    What is the Reverse Curl?

    The standard barbell biceps curl is a biceps-building exercise performed with the palms facing up. The reverse curl is the same elbow flexion movement, but it is done with the palms facing down.
    That small change in hand positioning will help build your arm muscles while helping prevent elbow and forearm injuries.
    Now, it's not going to make the list of coolest exercises, and you're certainly not going to use the heaviest of heavy weights for it. But rest assured, reverse bicep curls are a must for any biceps-building program.
    We will touch on how to do the curl properly in a bit. For now, let's discuss which muscles this curl variation works.
    What Muscles Do Reverse Curls Work?
    Okay, so we have established that the reverse curl is a vital exercise you should be doing. To understand why it's important, you need to know the reverse curls muscles worked.
    The muscles worked during reverse grip curls include:
    Biceps brachii:
    The most prominent muscle of the upper arm, the biceps may be small compared to the lats, but it's still very active in pulling motions, like in these bent-over row variations.
    The biceps brachii has two heads, a long head and short head, with two origin points on the scapula and one insertion point on the forearm.
    It is responsible for several actions, including shoulder flexion, elbow flexion, and forearm supination (when your forearm faces up). It's important to know that it crosses and affects two joints.
    Both heads are both active during curling and pulling movements, including the reverse curl.
    Brachialis:
    The biceps brachii typically gets all of the attention, but the brachialis, if built correctly, can help add some serious size to your upper arm.
    It is located beneath the biceps and is an elbow flexor that helps with the starting portion of curling exercises. You donít want to leave this untrained if you wish to have big biceps, as it helps to push the bicep up and build size.
    The takeaway here? Don't forget your brachialis exercises!
    Brachioradialis:
    The strongest and most visible muscle in your forearm, the brachioradialis helps prop up your bicep from underneath. It is a crucial forearm and elbow flexor and is highly activated during the reverse curl's negative lowering phase.
    Even though the reverse curl is a biceps curl, the brachioradialis is key to this movement and will help fix any forearm imbalances that may exist.

    Reverse Curls vs Bicep Curls vs Hammer Curls: Which is Better?
    Right off the bat, itís essential to clarify that when comparing hammer curls vs bicep curls vs reverse curls, all of these exercises are simply bicep curl variations. Think of them as different tools in your toolbox, each with their own role in sculpting the statuesque piece of art that is your bicep.
    This means they all have their place in your arm workout. There is not necessarily one that is so effective that it makes the others obsolete. The right move for you depends on which part of your arm needs more attention, your genetics, and existing imbalances from injuries, sports, and everyday life.
    Since they all have their place, itís important to figure out what each exerciseís main benefit is. Then you can structure your bicep-building program accordingly. Weíve got programming tips coming up shortly, but letís dive into each curl first.
    Bicep curls:

    This is the most common of all the variations. Bicep curls will activate the short head more than the other variations we're discussing.
    The short head is responsible for the peak of the muscle so think of it as building the mountain top. The bicep curl provides the most potential for lifting heavier weights, inciting muscle hypertrophy. This is because your hands are strongest in the palms up hands placement.
    It can also be a drawback since this will likely imbalance the forearm muscles if you are not evening them out with the appropriate exercises.
    In addition, the ability to use more weight during bicep curls leads to a greater chance that you'll start to use more momentum and poor form as your muscles fatigue. The biceps love to feel extreme contractions. This means it's important to leave your ego at the door and control this movement even when you are going heavy.
    Hammer curls:

    The hammer curl emphasizes the long head of the biceps, which when properly worked, creates more muscle thickness. Itís the same curling movement as standard bicep curls, except your hands face each other in a neutral grip position (we have a great article that further compares the hammer curl vs. bicep curl if you'd like to learn more).
    The hammer curl targets the brachialis and brachioradialis, similar to the reverse curl, but nearly all of the focus is on the long head of the bicep. The hand placement can make it harder to control heavier weights, so like the biceps curl, make sure to give your ego a stern talking to and avoid lifting too heavy.
    Hammer curls offer more wrist stability and grip strengthening than the biceps curl, so it is a great functional strength builder. This will have a carryover to simple everyday tasks like carrying groceries or walking your dog as those are usually grip-intensive tasks in which the hand is in a neutral grip position.
    Reverse curls:

    Reverse grip curls, the star of this article, strengthen the brachioradialis, making this exercise the best option for fixing forearm imbalances. It also builds muscle in the brachialis, which is a massive contributor to pushing the bicep up and increasing its size.
    Any exercise will be limited by its weakest link, and the first one that is likely to fail is your grip. The reverse curl increases your grip and forearm strength, which will directly benefit exercises like deadlifts, chin-ups, pull-ups, rows, and any other pulling movement you can think of.
    Equipment To Use For Reverse Curls
    The bicep reverse curl motion is pretty straightforward, so itís important to remember that for each variation, there are different implements you can use. Each personís anatomy and genetics are different, so find the variation that helps you feel the muscle working the most.


    Dumbbells: This is a great option for curls as you can work each arm independently, ensuring your muscles grow at the same rate. Nobody wants to look like a professional arm wrestler who only uses one side of their body. Dumbbells also allow you the freedom to perform different variations, like incline bench curls, preacher curls, and standing curls, none of which are limited by the barbell getting in the way.

    Barbell: The barbell enables you to use the most weight. If your goal is building muscular strength in your biceps, look no further than straight bar curls. It can also be used for preacher or traditional standing curls. Remember that you wonít be using the same weight for a reverse barbell curl as a regular straight bar curl.

    EZ Bar: The EZ Bar is also very popular as it takes some stress off the hands and wrists by allowing them to be in a better position. And it can be loaded heavier, making it a fan favorite. The straight bar or EZ curl bar is a standard gym option most people have access to.

    Cable Machine: The cable machine can also be used with several different attachments to perform reverse curls. The cable machine gets the nod for best time under tension as you will be more likely to control the negative as you fight against the cable and avoid letting the weight fall down. Remember, thatís the bread and butter of the reverse curl exercise.

    Kettlebells: Using kettlebells is a less standard version but can be a great addition to your program due to the weight distribution of the bell being under your hand instead of on the sides of the dumbbell. You will have to work hard to not let your wrists move, so start with a lighter weight.


    How to Perform The Reverse Barbell Curl
    These directions focus on barbell curls, but if you prefer a different piece of equipment, keep reading because we provide several great variations later on in this article.
    The movements remain the same, regardless of which implement you're using, or the workout split you're placing it in.
    How to do the Barbell Reverse Curl:


    Grab a barbell with an overhand grip (palms facing down) an inch or so wider than shoulder width, a thumb length away from your hips, keeping your elbows pinned to your sides. Make sure your feet are hip-width apart, and you're standing with a good upright posture.
    Tightly grip the bar and maintain a neutral wrist by stacking your fist over your wrist. Rotate your shoulders to ensure that your upper back and lats are engaged to support your posture. Tighten your butt and core to maintain an upright position. Start with your arms straight, keeping a slight bend in your elbows.
    Without swinging the weight, keep your arms still and flex your biceps until the barbell is close to your upper arms. The bar should finish close to your shoulders.
    Keep your hands tight and wrists neutral as you lower the weight down. Your elbows must stay pinned to your sides as you feel the forearm muscles burn to resist the downward motion.
    Repeat for indicated reps.


    Reverse Curl Mistakes to avoid:
    ?Get the most out of your reverse forearm curl by avoiding these 5 mistakes.

    Avoid using too much weight and not being able to control the movement.
    Don't lose tension on the muscle and instead rely on momentum.
    Avoid not controlling the negative and letting the weight fall back to the starting position.
    Don't lose tightness in your hands, allowing your wrists to flex or extend.
    Avoid keeping your elbows pinned to your sides.


    Benefits of the Reverse Biceps Curl
    From correcting muscle imbalances to ensuring your biceps look phenomenal in t-shirts, there are plenty of great reasons why your routine needs the reverse curl.


    Corrects imbalances: Reverse curls help fix forearm imbalances and elbow pain by building the brachialis and brachioradialis muscles.

    Targets the brachialis: The exercise builds bigger biceps by building the hidden and often forgotten brachialis muscle.

    Helps with grip strength: Reverse curls develop functional grip strength that helps with curls, carries, pulling exercises, and everyday tasks.

    Builds multiple arm muscles: Reverse curls are an efficient option to build your forearms and biceps at the same time. We love multi-tasking!

    4 Best Reverse Curl Variations
    These 4 great variations show you how to make good use of all of your gym equipment.
    Whether you prefer barbell reverse curls or the dumbbell variation, just make sure you incorporate reverse curls of some kind!
    1. EZ Bar Reverse Curl:

    The reverse EZ bar curl variation is beloved by bodybuilders as it puts less stress on the wrist compared to a fully pronated grip. And with the handles being at an angle, it still offers the benefits of the reverse curl.
    However, it makes it easier to keep your elbows at your sides and not overstress your wrists.
    2. Dumbbell reverse curl:

    Dumbbells always get the nod for allowing you to work one side at a time. Unilateral movements allow you to give each side extra focus, making this exercise amazing for fixing imbalances.
    The reverse dumbbell curl is a must for a biceps workout.
    3. Reverse Cable Curl:

    The cable allows you to use several different attachments, including the straight bar, single handle, or EZ curl bar.
    The tension of the cable provides a serious burn during the lowering portion of this exercise, which is the most crucial part.
    4. Preacher reverse curls:

    Whether you use the EZ bar, straight bar, or dumbbells for preacher reverse curls, its primary benefit is the bench, which prevents the other muscles of the upper body from stepping in.
    If you are having trouble maintaining your posture during curls, give the preacher reverse curl a shot.
    Reverse Curl Programming Tips
    Remember that the reverse curl is just one piece of the biceps-building puzzle. If you have not been doing reverse wrist curls, try adding them to the end of your bicep routine, aiming for 2-3 sets of 8-10 reps.
    Remember, at the end of your arm workout, your muscles will already be fatigued. And the reverse curl is already an exercise where form and control are king, so go lighter at first with the goal of utilizing progressive overload over the next few weeks.
    If your grip is especially weak or you have wrist problems, the EZ barbell reverse curl is a better option since you do not need such an intense, fully pronated grip.
    Speaking of an extra weak grip, if you are lagging behind in this department or have elbow pain from imbalanced forearms, try adding reverse curls to the end of your arm day, as well as your back day, or a back and biceps workout, to help balance out the problem.
    If you are a rotational sport athlete, always hold your bag or walk your dog with the same hand, or if one side is clearly weaker than the other, dumbbells are a safe bet to help you fix this issue. Use the dumbbell variation to work one side at a time until the issue is resolved, and you can move on to the EZ bar reverse curl variation.
    Try the barbell reverse curl if you donít have any issues and are a more seasoned lifter. If your wrists are having a tough time with the barbell, check out the other options mentioned above.

    Sample Biceps Workout
    Here is a biceps workout highlighting how you can add the reverse curl into your routine. This biceps workout can be incorporated into a full arm day routine, on a pull day when you are finishing off with biceps, or if you are someone who likes contrasting muscle groups, it can be added at the end of a push day.
    Full Biceps Building Workout:

    Alternating Standing Dumbbell Curl: 2x6 reps
    Concentration DB Hammer Curl: 2x8 reps
    Standing Reverse Barbell Curl: 2x10 reps
    Preacher Reverse EZ Bar Curl 2x12 reps


    Reverse Curl Alternatives
    Looking for a completely different move that will yield the same bicep-building results? These alternatives will do the trick!

    Dumbbell Zottman Curls
    Neutral Grip Pull Ups
    Rope Climbs
    Rope Hammer Curls
    Pull Ups


    Reverse Curls FAQs
    Let's answer any lingering reverse curls questions you may have.
    Do reverse curls build forearms?
    Reverse curls are a great exercise to build your forearms. The brachioradialis is a key forearm muscle directly targeted by this exercise.
    Are reverse curls effective?
    Absolutely! Imbalanced forearm muscles almost always lead to elbow pain and shoulder issues. The straight barbell reverse curl not only makes your arms look better but also keeps you injury free.
    Which bicep head do reverse curls work?
    Both heads of the biceps brachii are worked during this exercise, but the main benefit for the biceps is that it builds the brachialis underneath the biceps.
    Most people donít forget bicep curls in their upper body workout, but they often forget about the muscles associated with the reverse curl. Pick the variation that works best for you and your body, and don't forget to do them!
    By now, you should see all the hidden benefits of adding this exercise to your training for longevity and injury prevention. Plus, who doesn't want sleeve-busting biceps and Popeye-like forearms?
    Related:


    Lifters everywhere love striking the double biceps pose as a way to show off their hard work in the gym. After all, what could be a better gym business card than showcasing the peak and thickness of the mountain on your upper arm?


    Whether you are just starting out or are a seasoned lifter, you're likely all too familiar with bicep curls. But are you missing out on a move that can help you progress even more? If you aren't doing reverse curls, then the answer to that question is a resounding yes.


    If reverse curls don't have a spot in your routine, not only are you leaving some bicep gains on the table, but you're also missing out on the chance to fix forearm imbalances. Fortunately, we're about to get into the nitty-gritty of the reverse curl, so you can get it into your split quickly.


    This post will cover:


    • What is the reverse curl?
    • What muscles do reverse curls work?
    • Reverse curls vs. bicep curls vs. hammer curls: Which is better?
    • Equipment to use for reverse curls
    • How to perform the reverse barbell curl and mistakes to avoid
    • Benefits of the reverse bicep curl
    • Best reverse curl variations, alternatives, and programming tips
    • Sample biceps workout




    What is the Reverse Curl?

    The standard barbell biceps curl is a biceps-building exercise performed with the palms facing up. The reverse curl is the same elbow flexion movement, but it is done with the palms facing down.


    That small change in hand positioning will help build your arm muscles while helping prevent elbow and forearm injuries.


    Now, it's not going to make the list of coolest exercises, and you're certainly not going to use the heaviest of heavy weights for it. But rest assured, reverse bicep curls are a must for any biceps-building program.


    We will touch on how to do the curl properly in a bit. For now, let's discuss which muscles this curl variation works.


    What Muscles Do Reverse Curls Work?
    Okay, so we have established that the reverse curl is a vital exercise you should be doing. To understand why it's important, you need to know the reverse curls muscles worked.


    The muscles worked during reverse grip curls include:


    Biceps brachii:
    The most prominent muscle of the upper arm, the biceps may be small compared to the lats, but it's still very active in pulling motions, like in these bent-over row variations.


    The biceps brachii has two heads, a long head and short head, with two origin points on the scapula and one insertion point on the forearm.


    It is responsible for several actions, including shoulder flexion, elbow flexion, and forearm supination (when your forearm faces up). It's important to know that it crosses and affects two joints.


    Both heads are both active during curling and pulling movements, including the reverse curl.


    Brachialis:
    The biceps brachii typically gets all of the attention, but the brachialis, if built correctly, can help add some serious size to your upper arm.


    It is located beneath the biceps and is an elbow flexor that helps with the starting portion of curling exercises. You donít want to leave this untrained if you wish to have big biceps, as it helps to push the bicep up and build size.


    The takeaway here? Don't forget your brachialis exercises!


    Brachioradialis:
    The strongest and most visible muscle in your forearm, the brachioradialis helps prop up your bicep from underneath. It is a crucial forearm and elbow flexor and is highly activated during the reverse curl's negative lowering phase.


    Even though the reverse curl is a biceps curl, the brachioradialis is key to this movement and will help fix any forearm imbalances that may exist.





    Reverse Curls vs Bicep Curls vs Hammer Curls: Which is Better?
    Right off the bat, itís essential to clarify that when comparing hammer curls vs bicep curls vs reverse curls, all of these exercises are simply bicep curl variations. Think of them as different tools in your toolbox, each with their own role in sculpting the statuesque piece of art that is your bicep.


    This means they all have their place in your arm workout. There is not necessarily one that is so effective that it makes the others obsolete. The right move for you depends on which part of your arm needs more attention, your genetics, and existing imbalances from injuries, sports, and everyday life.


    Since they all have their place, itís important to figure out what each exerciseís main benefit is. Then you can structure your bicep-building program accordingly. Weíve got programming tips coming up shortly, but letís dive into each curl first.


    Bicep curls:



    This is the most common of all the variations. Bicep curls will activate the short head more than the other variations we're discussing.


    The short head is responsible for the peak of the muscle so think of it as building the mountain top. The bicep curl provides the most potential for lifting heavier weights, inciting muscle hypertrophy. This is because your hands are strongest in the palms up hands placement.


    It can also be a drawback since this will likely imbalance the forearm muscles if you are not evening them out with the appropriate exercises.


    In addition, the ability to use more weight during bicep curls leads to a greater chance that you'll start to use more momentum and poor form as your muscles fatigue. The biceps love to feel extreme contractions. This means it's important to leave your ego at the door and control this movement even when you are going heavy.


    Hammer curls:



    The hammer curl emphasizes the long head of the biceps, which when properly worked, creates more muscle thickness. Itís the same curling movement as standard bicep curls, except your hands face each other in a neutral grip position (we have a great article that further compares the hammer curl vs. bicep curl if you'd like to learn more).


    The hammer curl targets the brachialis and brachioradialis, similar to the reverse curl, but nearly all of the focus is on the long head of the bicep. The hand placement can make it harder to control heavier weights, so like the biceps curl, make sure to give your ego a stern talking to and avoid lifting too heavy.


    Hammer curls offer more wrist stability and grip strengthening than the biceps curl, so it is a great functional strength builder. This will have a carryover to simple everyday tasks like carrying groceries or walking your dog as those are usually grip-intensive tasks in which the hand is in a neutral grip position.


    Reverse curls:



    Reverse grip curls, the star of this article, strengthen the brachioradialis, making this exercise the best option for fixing forearm imbalances. It also builds muscle in the brachialis, which is a massive contributor to pushing the bicep up and increasing its size.


    Any exercise will be limited by its weakest link, and the first one that is likely to fail is your grip. The reverse curl increases your grip and forearm strength, which will directly benefit exercises like deadlifts, chin-ups, pull-ups, rows, and any other pulling movement you can think of.


    Equipment To Use For Reverse Curls
    The bicep reverse curl motion is pretty straightforward, so itís important to remember that for each variation, there are different implements you can use. Each personís anatomy and genetics are different, so find the variation that helps you feel the muscle working the most.



    • Dumbbells: This is a great option for curls as you can work each arm independently, ensuring your muscles grow at the same rate. Nobody wants to look like a professional arm wrestler who only uses one side of their body. Dumbbells also allow you the freedom to perform different variations, like incline bench curls, preacher curls, and standing curls, none of which are limited by the barbell getting in the way.

    • Barbell: The barbell enables you to use the most weight. If your goal is building muscular strength in your biceps, look no further than straight bar curls. It can also be used for preacher or traditional standing curls. Remember that you wonít be using the same weight for a reverse barbell curl as a regular straight bar curl.

    • EZ Bar: The EZ Bar is also very popular as it takes some stress off the hands and wrists by allowing them to be in a better position. And it can be loaded heavier, making it a fan favorite. The straight bar or EZ curl bar is a standard gym option most people have access to.

    • Cable Machine: The cable machine can also be used with several different attachments to perform reverse curls. The cable machine gets the nod for best time under tension as you will be more likely to control the negative as you fight against the cable and avoid letting the weight fall down. Remember, thatís the bread and butter of the reverse curl exercise.

    • Kettlebells: Using kettlebells is a less standard version but can be a great addition to your program due to the weight distribution of the bell being under your hand instead of on the sides of the dumbbell. You will have to work hard to not let your wrists move, so start with a lighter weight.


    How to Perform The Reverse Barbell Curl
    These directions focus on barbell curls, but if you prefer a different piece of equipment, keep reading because we provide several great variations later on in this article.


    The movements remain the same, regardless of which implement you're using, or the workout split you're placing it in.


    How to do the Barbell Reverse Curl:





    • Grab a barbell with an overhand grip (palms facing down) an inch or so wider than shoulder width, a thumb length away from your hips, keeping your elbows pinned to your sides. Make sure your feet are hip-width apart, and you're standing with a good upright posture.
    • Tightly grip the bar and maintain a neutral wrist by stacking your fist over your wrist. Rotate your shoulders to ensure that your upper back and lats are engaged to support your posture. Tighten your butt and core to maintain an upright position. Start with your arms straight, keeping a slight bend in your elbows.
    • Without swinging the weight, keep your arms still and flex your biceps until the barbell is close to your upper arms. The bar should finish close to your shoulders.
    • Keep your hands tight and wrists neutral as you lower the weight down. Your elbows must stay pinned to your sides as you feel the forearm muscles burn to resist the downward motion.
    • Repeat for indicated reps.


    Reverse Curl Mistakes to avoid:
    ?Get the most out of your reverse forearm curl by avoiding these 5 mistakes.


    [*]Avoid using too much weight and not being able to control the movement.[*]Don't lose tension on the muscle and instead rely on momentum.[*]Avoid not controlling the negative and letting the weight fall back to the starting position.[*]Don't lose tightness in your hands, allowing your wrists to flex or extend.[*]Avoid keeping your elbows pinned to your sides.


    Benefits of the Reverse Biceps Curl
    From correcting muscle imbalances to ensuring your biceps look phenomenal in t-shirts, there are plenty of great reasons why your routine needs the reverse curl.



    • Corrects imbalances: Reverse curls help fix forearm imbalances and elbow pain by building the brachialis and brachioradialis muscles.

    • Targets the brachialis: The exercise builds bigger biceps by building the hidden and often forgotten brachialis muscle.

    • Helps with grip strength: Reverse curls develop functional grip strength that helps with curls, carries, pulling exercises, and everyday tasks.

    • Builds multiple arm muscles: Reverse curls are an efficient option to build your forearms and biceps at the same time. We love multi-tasking!

    4 Best Reverse Curl Variations
    These 4 great variations show you how to make good use of all of your gym equipment.


    Whether you prefer barbell reverse curls or the dumbbell variation, just make sure you incorporate reverse curls of some kind!


    1. EZ Bar Reverse Curl:



    The reverse EZ bar curl variation is beloved by bodybuilders as it puts less stress on the wrist compared to a fully pronated grip. And with the handles being at an angle, it still offers the benefits of the reverse curl.


    However, it makes it easier to keep your elbows at your sides and not overstress your wrists.


    2. Dumbbell reverse curl:



    Dumbbells always get the nod for allowing you to work one side at a time. Unilateral movements allow you to give each side extra focus, making this exercise amazing for fixing imbalances.


    The reverse dumbbell curl is a must for a biceps workout.


    3. Reverse Cable Curl:



    The cable allows you to use several different attachments, including the straight bar, single handle, or EZ curl bar.


    The tension of the cable provides a serious burn during the lowering portion of this exercise, which is the most crucial part.


    4. Preacher reverse curls:



    Whether you use the EZ bar, straight bar, or dumbbells for preacher reverse curls, its primary benefit is the bench, which prevents the other muscles of the upper body from stepping in.


    If you are having trouble maintaining your posture during curls, give the preacher reverse curl a shot.


    Reverse Curl Programming Tips
    Remember that the reverse curl is just one piece of the biceps-building puzzle. If you have not been doing reverse wrist curls, try adding them to the end of your bicep routine, aiming for 2-3 sets of 8-10 reps.


    Remember, at the end of your arm workout, your muscles will already be fatigued. And the reverse curl is already an exercise where form and control are king, so go lighter at first with the goal of utilizing progressive overload over the next few weeks.


    If your grip is especially weak or you have wrist problems, the EZ barbell reverse curl is a better option since you do not need such an intense, fully pronated grip.


    Speaking of an extra weak grip, if you are lagging behind in this department or have elbow pain from imbalanced forearms, try adding reverse curls to the end of your arm day, as well as your back day, or a back and biceps workout, to help balance out the problem.


    If you are a rotational sport athlete, always hold your bag or walk your dog with the same hand, or if one side is clearly weaker than the other, dumbbells are a safe bet to help you fix this issue. Use the dumbbell variation to work one side at a time until the issue is resolved, and you can move on to the EZ bar reverse curl variation.


    Try the barbell reverse curl if you donít have any issues and are a more seasoned lifter. If your wrists are having a tough time with the barbell, check out the other options mentioned above.





    Sample Biceps Workout
    Here is a biceps workout highlighting how you can add the reverse curl into your routine. This biceps workout can be incorporated into a full arm day routine, on a pull day when you are finishing off with biceps, or if you are someone who likes contrasting muscle groups, it can be added at the end of a push day.


    Full Biceps Building Workout:
    • Alternating Standing Dumbbell Curl: 2x6 reps
    • Concentration DB Hammer Curl: 2x8 reps
    • Standing Reverse Barbell Curl: 2x10 reps
    • Preacher Reverse EZ Bar Curl 2x12 reps


    Reverse Curl Alternatives
    Looking for a completely different move that will yield the same bicep-building results? These alternatives will do the trick!


    • Dumbbell Zottman Curls
    • Neutral Grip Pull Ups
    • Rope Climbs
    • Rope Hammer Curls
    • Pull Ups


    Reverse Curls FAQs
    Let's answer any lingering reverse curls questions you may have.


    Do reverse curls build forearms?
    Reverse curls are a great exercise to build your forearms. The brachioradialis is a key forearm muscle directly targeted by this exercise.


    Are reverse curls effective?
    Absolutely! Imbalanced forearm muscles almost always lead to elbow pain and shoulder issues. The straight barbell reverse curl not only makes your arms look better but also keeps you injury free.


    Which bicep head do reverse curls work?
    Both heads of the biceps brachii are worked during this exercise, but the main benefit for the biceps is that it builds the brachialis underneath the biceps.


    Most people donít forget bicep curls in their upper body workout, but they often forget about the muscles associated with the reverse curl. Pick the variation that works best for you and your body, and don't forget to do them!


    By now, you should see all the hidden benefits of adding this exercise to your training for longevity and injury prevention. Plus, who doesn't want sleeve-busting biceps and Popeye-like forearms?


    Related:











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    Thankyou so much for the details information I also read an article hope this bicep curls helps you
     

  3. #3
    YourMuscleShop Rep Board Certified DMD
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    I regularly incorporate Reverse Curls into my Arms workouts.

    I Love them.


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