The body uses two main fuels: carbohydrates and fats. However, carbohydrates can deliver energy much faster to the muscles than fats as it is necessary for higher intensity exercise.
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😩Unfortunately, carbohydrate stores are relatively small: the body stores
carbohydrates as glycogen in the muscles and in the liver. In the muscle we have roughly 500-800 g and a single training session can pauperize these stores of as much as 24-40% hence impairing further performance and recovery. Muscle damage that accompanies resistance training impairs glycogen resynthesis as well.
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🤔How many carbs should you consume?After you've established your caloric intake and determined protein and fat targets, we suggest to set carbohydrate intake between 3-5 g/Kg if you're involved in strength sports or have a lower caloric budget, while if you're a bodybuilder or have an higher caloric budget then we would consider a reasonable amount 4-7 g/Kg for both genders.
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🥔The selection of the sources should depend on how close you are to your training session and how many calories you can invest to hit your current target. If you're far away from the session or you're dieting on poverty calories, we suggest to hold on to more complex sources that keep you satiated for longer with a lower palatability. On the other hand, if the training session is approaching or you can invest more calories, you can decide upon more palatable options while still paying attention to optimal digestion.
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💪🏽In order to optimize resistance training recovery and body composition, peri-training nutrition becomes of greater importance. As an example, a trainee with a 300 g budget can strategically split his intake sandwiching his workout with the greater 200 g chunk whilst dividing the remaining 100 g between the first and the last meal.
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🏋🏽*♂️Make sure to combine carbohydrate and protein acutely following resistance training to provide more favourable recovery outcomes, including glycogen resynthesis and MPS, rather than ingesting either nutrient alone.